Kosher Food Pantry Serves Needy Of All Faiths

Are you doing your best to eat well and exercise, but the pounds just aren’t coming off as fast as you would like? The ancient Chinese knew something about how food affects our bodies that most of us don’t seem to notice. Could how your food tastes be putting the brakes on your weight loss?
8 Practice Self-Talk. Keep telling yourself that you want to be successful, can be successful and that you will be successful. A detailed look at effortless methods for nutrisystem frozen food. Be your own pep rally leader. It really is possible to control your own feelings and attitudes.
Switch over to a cash economy. Just do it. Start out deciding how much money you usually spend using credit cards and checks, and take out that amount in cash for a week, two weeks, or a month. If you and your family members spend through it before that period is over, stay home and stop spending, until the next period starts. Consumer research has shown that by moving to a cash economy, people spend on average 20-25% less than if they used a credit card. Use that research to benefit you. Get into the habit of using currency, not plastic.
Awareness: Making conscious choices about what you put in your mouth makes a huge difference. When you are paying attention, you are less likely to want to fill up with “junk” calories. Before you laugh this off, try eating with all your senses. Mindful eating involves really experiencing your food – appreciate the colors and textures, relish the aroma and flavor, and fully savor it. I’ve had a surprising number of people tell me that treats they used to like no longer appealed to them once they tuned in.
In the West we all know about how the calories in our food affects our weight. However, most of the time it is the way food tastes that affects the foods we select to eat. It is strange then that the way food tastes seems completely missing from our awareness of our diet and nutrition. The senses of smell and taste that are so active when we are eating have a direct neurological connection with our brains. It is our brains that tell us when to eat, what to eat, how much to eat and so on. It makes sense then to pay attention to the flavor of food just as much as any other aspect of it.
Parish, an establishment on North Highland Avenue, will be having its Mardi gras party on Saturday February 21st, from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The Charlie Wooten Band and Zydefunk will be performing live. Cajun food, including a whole roasted pig, will be provided, as well as alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Tickets may be purchased for $35, or $40 at the door. A portion of the profits from this event will be donated to the Atlanta food as medicine Bank.
Lemongrass. In Thailand, lemongrass is used in many different Thai foods. It’s particularly common in soups (especially the Thai favorite Tom Kha Gai), where the pungent smell quickly becomes familiar. My Thai friends tell me it’s good for colds and fever, for arthritis and it removes toxins from your liver, bladder and kidneys. In Thailand, it’s also available as lemongrass juice, which is drunk with sugar. It’s also widely used in soaps as it cleans the skin very well, and as an insect repellent – especially useful in a country that has so many mosquitoes.
And we saved the best for last: Enjoy dark chocolate or cocoa to halt inflammation! How much: An ounce of extra-dark chocolate (70 percent cocoa or higher) several times each week. My tip: Go for fair trade, organic, gluten-free Sjaak’s Organic Extra Dark Chocolate bar 70% Cacao (click to order now).local, travel, nutrition, health and fitness, alternative, health, fitness & exercise, fertility & pregnancy, drugs & medications, diseases & conditions, dieting & weight loss, alternative medicine, pain management